pedestrian crossing

29 | Put a curb cut and crosswalk on it! by keihly moore

Put a curb cut and new crosswalk on it!

Before: No curb cut or crosswalk at the corridor entrance. (It's over about 35' from the entrance to the right in this picture. See second picture below for the existing crosswalk.)

After: Curb cut and colorful crosswalk to make the crossing safer. 

Why does the Southwest Corridor crosswalk and curb cut at Amory Street not align with the entrance? Can we please provide easier access? It's dangerous for cyclists and strollers as designed, because when exiting the trail, the narrow sidewalk does not allow a full perpendicular alignment to the road, so they are unable to easy see if traffic is coming from both directions. I wonder how long it would take to get this fixed? Months? Years? See below for the existing crosswalk. 

Existing: Here's the state of the crosswalk today, about 35' to the right of the existing Southwest Corridor entrance. It needs to be repainted and we need to add another at the entrance! 

26 | Put Polka Dots on it! by keihly moore

By Keihly Moore, by way of City Lab

Put polka dots and flexible bollards on it!

Giving space back to pedestrians in a colorful manner. Image courtesy of CityLab/City of Austin

I was very excited when I read this article, "Polka Dots help pedestrians reclaim space in Austin," by City Lab. Finally! These are the measures we're talking about - simple, relatively low cost additions to our streets that make a big difference in safety, perception, and beauty. With thinking like this, dangerous intersections can be transformed all over the world. I applaud Austin - thanks for taking the lead in creative solutions! 

 

22 | Update! It's Built! by keihly moore

Put (real) stripes and a curb cut on it!

Way back in January 2014, I dreamt of making more obvious a connection that was natural to all those who "jaywalked" across Church Street to their favorite watering hole. Now, thanks to lots of work in the City and advocacy by Scott Curry, the stripes are real! 

After for real: May 2015 - the connection is complete! Put stripes and a curb cut on it! (photo: Dylan McKnight)

I've heard second hand that the image I imagined provided a good start to the conversation and got everyone on the same page for what the crosswalk could look like. It's a spark that started the fire! 

Before: Fall 2013: No midblock crosswalk, despite the obvious beckoning of Latta Arcade.

After (proposed): My vision of what it could look like. 

Yay for getting things done! Thanks to Dylan McKnight who took the current photograph. 

13 | Monroe Road Street Fix by Aleksandra Borisenko

Put a planted median, on-street parking, street trees, multi-use path, pedestrian crossing and urban housing on it! 

by Aleksandra Borisenko

Before:   Monroe road is a 4-lane road that lacks infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists. The two-story apartments will soon be demolished and they will be replaced by a new multi-use development. 

Before: Monroe road is a 4-lane road that lacks infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists. The two-story apartments will soon be demolished and they will be replaced by a new multi-use development. 

After:   With the new development, there's a fantastic opportunity re-imagine Monroe Road as a more attractive and safe street for different modes of transportation. A planted median and on-street parking can help the road feel more intimate and make it safer for pedestrians and bicyclists to cross. A generous multi-use path provides a much needed infrastructure for residents to get to the new development and surrounding neighborhoods by foot or on bicycles.  

After: With the new development, there's a fantastic opportunity re-imagine Monroe Road as a more attractive and safe street for different modes of transportation. A planted median and on-street parking can help the road feel more intimate and make it safer for pedestrians and bicyclists to cross. A generous multi-use path provides a much needed infrastructure for residents to get to the new development and surrounding neighborhoods by foot or on bicycles.